D5 Class 14.2

Apr 29

Homework

E-Portfolio

  1. Go to bu.digication.com
  2. Login using your BU id
  3. Click on "Create" or on the big "+" sign to start a portfolio for your CGS work
  4. When prompted to choose a Template, use "CGS Team D 2021"
  5. The tabs in this template correspond to your CGS classes. For each of the tabs, upload your favorite assignment.

Problems? I may have time for troubleshooting before or after class. You can also see me in office hours for help.

Practice Intro

Last class I had you look at two introductions to identify key moves you should consider making in your upcoming essay. Of course, these two introductions come from 25-page essays; your intro needs to be a good bit shorter, using just one or three sentences for each of the moves. Practice this by writing either:

  • a trial intro for your upcoming research essay
  • an intro for the pretend essay we worked on in lecture, where we outlined an essay on the cultural significance of chocolate chip cookies, drawing on recipes and oral interviews.

In addition to the moves discussed in class last time, consider presenting your thesis by reference to the evidence that your essay draws upon.

Post as homework, in the comments below.

Presentations 3 of 3

D5

  1. Harry H
  2. Eric J
  3. Will L
  4. Joahan S
  5. Aaron L

D6

  1. Jaz P
  2. Victoria G
  3. Joe C
  4. Kate V
  5. Lily B

D7

  1. Tiara M
  2. Sunny F
  3. Sophia C
  4. Zeya W
  5. Allison L

22 responses to “D5 Class 14.2

    • Excellent work. Referencing the 4 key moves from yesterday’s HW (click “Previous” for details), you do 1, 2, 3, and 4.

      One thing: I like the fact that you reference your body of evidence in the process of voicing your thesis claim. But do it in that order: describe your body of E, then voice your thesis, not the other way round. That way you end the ¶ on a high note: what you will argue.

    • Interesting effort to motivate interest in Benito M as a means of grounding accusations of “fascist!” on the internet.

      But, referencing the 4 key moves from yesterday’s HW (click “Previous” for details), this means you’ve done 1 & 2, but not 3 or 4.

  1. Plastic, Paper, Paper, Plastic. Those words are ubiquitous at the checkout counter of any grocery store. “Plastic, please.” is a common reply. Just like people bag their groceries in wasteful, single-use materials, manufacturers and grocers have an overpackaging problem. From when the product is packed into individually portioned sizes to the materials of those packages, and finally the secondary packaging, we have gotten out of control as a society with the overuse of disposable packaging. Oftentimes our food products come packaged in as many as four layers of single-use material to transport the product from the factory to our mouths. Packaging waste makes up a substantial portion of municipal solid waste. We live in a modern society full of convenience. Without the food packaging, we would not have the luxury of the convenience and longevity we have become accustomed to in the grocery store. Throughout history, people have been using a plethora of different items to store their food. In the more modern years, material developments have allowed us to expand food packaging abilities and open up possibilities for new products. With the convenience this has created, the new materials invented, specifically plastic, have created problems consequential to the benefits they provide. Our society has emphasized convenience that we have lost sight of the impact this overpackaging causes. It is time to take a step back to focus on how our packaging obsession is causing tremendous amounts of unnecessary waste and impacting our environment.

    • You make use of everyday experience to motivate interest in your topic. But—referencing the 4 key moves from yesterday’s HW—this means you’ve done 1 & 2, but not 3 or 4.

    • Great work. Referencing the 4 key moves from yesterday’s HW (click “Previous” for details), you’ve done 1, 2, 3 and 4.

      #3 is a bit weak, though, since you don’t name a specific scholar.

      #1 is ok, but might be made more vivid by focusing on an anecdote: any of the many stories of asians attacked in the streets in recent months, perhaps.

    • Great work. Referencing the 4 key moves from yesterday’s HW (click “Previous” for details), you do 1, 2, 3 and 4, in that order.

      #3 would be more effective if you referenced a specific scholar by name.

      #2 would work better if you didn’t immediately answer the question you posed—the point is to pose a question that you’ll ponder for the rest of the essay. If you answer it right off, that motive is undermined.

  2. The rapid spread of misinformation has plagued social media and news media’s integrity for the past decade. While it’s common knowledge just how present misinformation on the internet can be, what is not acknowledged as much is the profound effect misinformation can have on democracies and populations across the globe. Research about the American public’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic and general conduct throughout the 2020 Presidential Elections show how much of an impact simple lies can have. In order to combat misinformation to preserve knowledge and democracy in the future we need better education and stricter guidlines for social and news media.

    • Good work. Referencing the 4 key moves from yesterday’s HW (click “Previous” for details), you do 1, 3, 4 but not 2—which is fine.

      #1 would be stronger if you gave a vivid anecdote, rather than a generalization.

      #3 would be stronger if you referenced a particular scholar by name—and then advanced your thesis as in some way bouncing off of that scholar’s understanding of the topic.

  3. Cancel Culture is a “modern form of ostracism in which someone is thrust out of social or professional circles-whether it be online, or social media, or in person.” This form of social exclusion is relatively new, yet it is already one of the most controversial political issues in the United States. While there may be piles of evidence why Cancel Culture is not bringing about social change, much of the United States still utilizes this tool today. Why? Amanda Koontz, Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Central Florida, says that “so often we are told, ‘we must act and speak out, or we are part of the problem,’ and therefore we are not necessarily taught or trained that inaction or not speaking out can be a form of social-justice action.” We are part of the problem, and because of social media, our moral obligation to speak out has only become stronger. According to google trends, the institution of Cancel Culture has only become increasingly popular, especially in the years 2018 forward, but there are correlations between Cancel Culture and other processes throughout history. However, what exactly are the cultural differences between these different processes and why is Cancel Culture so prevalent in contemporary society today? This movement has steadily increased over the last couple of years and only really started hitting its stride when it began being widely utilized in the #MeToo movement and other movements that demand a greater accountability from public influential figures.

    • Good work. Referencing the 4 key moves from yesterday’s HW (click “Previous” for details), you do all four—indeed you do #2 twice. I’m not sure that’s a good idea, though. Focus on the question that your essay will focus on—the one that can’t be readily answered.

      For move #1, consider opening with a brief anecdote—one that captures either the promise or the hazards of cancel culture. A vivid instance will engage your reader more effectively than a definition of the term.

    • Good work. Referencing the 4 key moves from yesterday’s HW (click “Previous” for details), you do 1, 3 and 4, but not #2—which is fine.

      #1 would be stronger if you gave a vivid anecdote, rather than a generalization.

      #3 would be stronger if you referenced a particular scholar by name—and then advanced your thesis as in some way bouncing off of that scholar’s understanding of the topic.

    • Good work. Referencing the 4 key moves from yesterday’s HW (click “Previous” for details), you do 1, 2 and 4, but not #3.

      I really like the way you engage our attention by presenting a bunch of things people say when commenting on someone’s weight. You might consider putting those each in quotation marks, to call them out, distinguishing them from what you are saying.

      Your thesis feels like advocacy, rather than like scholarship. I’m not saying you can’t be an advocate and a scholar, but you need to set your advocacy to one side during the essay body, so as to argue a claim about the body positivity movement.

      Citing a prior scholar as a point of reference (i.e. move #3) might help you gain distance from the topic, setting you up to advance a thesis claim that expresses a scholarly understanding rather than expressing a political stance.

  4. Cancel Culture is essentially the modern form of Ostracism that is strongly linked to forms of boycotting and protests. The origination of the term ‘canceled can be drawn back to the Athenian government. Whether it be on the internet, on social media platforms, or in person, people who are ostracized are considered to be ‘canceled’. This movement has grown large over the years and had recently started getting popular in early 2018. Cancel Culture has become the new norm in our society where many can humiliate on social media with just the press of a button.

    • Your opening sentence sounds like a thesis claim, rather than like an effort to orient the reader. Start with a vivid instance!

      I don’t see any of the other moves discussed in the last class’s HW—you might want to review that HW to get a sense of what you should be aiming for.

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